Posts Tagged ‘wyeast’

partial mash IPA brew day

Monday, December 21st, 2009

sweet, sweet wort...

on sunday CB rolled by and I whipped up an IPA using a partial mash recipe I formulated based on a couple of sources.

  • additionally, I slightly modified the hop bill from my very first brew session (a recipe from robert over at what used to be fermentation frenzy):
    • 1oz. columbus @ 75
    • 1oz. columbus @ 55
    • 1oz. columbus @ 20
    • 1oz. amarillo @ 10
    • 1.5oz. amarillo @ 0
    • dry-hop 1.5oz amarillo, 1oz. columbus
  • my batch sparge went fine – I added a little over a gallon of 160F water to the mash, resulting in a mash temp of around 152F.  I mashed for an hour and sparged with the same amount of water at the same temp.
  • it had been a little while since I had cracked out my scratch-built mash tun, and the little guy worked like a dream.  in fact, I am debating picking up a turkey fryer and boil pot and doing some all-grain beers with it in the near future…
  • the hop schedule was originally @60, 40, 15, 5, and 0, but things got a little hairy during bottling of my imperial espresso stout (lowdown to come) and the boil got inadvertently extended.
  • my starter of wyeast cali 1 was bubbling along nicely, and after a shot of O2 and some healthy yeast, fermentation kicked off in no time.
  • I plan on tossing the dry hops into primary next week, and kegging a week or so after that.

the grain bill

heating the strike water

close to optimal mash temps

the stovetop lineup

my high-tech runoff

closeup of second runnings

the leftovers

tossing in the starter

homebrewed belgian quadrupel

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

belgian quad straight from the tap

about a year ago I decided to brew one of my favorite styles – a belgian quadrupel.

  • I love the general complexity, intense flavor, and alcohol bite of a well-made quad.  some of my favorite (accessible) quads are pannepot old fisherman’s ale, st. bernardus abt 12, and rochefort 10.
  • I especially enjoy the “cola” flavors of the 10, so I initially was planning on brewing a clone of that brew, but BYO came out with an extract clone recipe for the abt 12 that looked too good to pass up.  I can’t find that issue for the life of me, but I managed to find the all-grain counterpart online:
    • St. Bernardus 12
    • OG=1.103
    • FG.=1.017
      IBU=15
      SRM=37
      ABV.=11%

      10#’s Pilsener malt
      3.0 #’s Munich malt
      1.0 #’s aromatic malt
      0.5 #’s Carafa Special III malt
      3.0 #’s Belgian candi syrup (Dark 2) (15 min)
      3.5 AAU Wye Challenger hops
      (60 min) (0.50 oz. 7% alpha acids)
      1.3 AAU Styrian Goldings (20 min)
      (0.25 oz. of 5% alpha acid)
      Wyeast 3787 (Trappist High Gravity) yeast

      Step by Step:
      Mash with a 15 minute rest at 135 deg.F, a 35 minute rest at 145 deg F, and a 25 minute rest at 165 deg F, a 5 minutes at 172 deg F. Boil wort for 60 minutes, adding hops and sugars at times indicated in the ingredient list. Cool wort and aerate. Pitch yeast at 70 deg. F. Let fermentation temperature rise to around 83 deg F. Rack beer to secondary and condition for six to eight weeks at 50 deg. F. Carbonate to 3.0 – 3.5 volumes of CO2.

  • I remember that I may have substituted 1762 for the 3787, but it was a while back.  both yeasts seem great for this brew.
  • A few weeks back I tapped the keg (after close to a year in secondary), and was definitely satisfied with the results.  The beer has a fruity, mildly alcoholic nose, and is smooth and drinkable with good mouthfeel.  The taste has hints of cola and molasses, has fine carbonation, and leaves a sticky sweet finish in the glass.  There is plenty of this beer left, and you can only drink so much at a time, but I am already dreading the eventual kicking of this keg!

quad in the glass

top view of the quad

fantome saison

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009

fantome saison

ah, fantome, how I love your saison.

  • the sheer fruitiness of this beer is unreal! I cannot believe how much tropical fruit aroma and flavor come from this yeast alone.  the fruit is not overwhelming though, it is very complementary, and the beer is ultimately complex and drinkable.
  • in fact, I have come across more than a couple clone recipes for this beer that call for strawberry, guava, and other juices in order to replicate the fruit elements of this yeast.  however, I have heard that wyeast occasionally releases a special strain of this yeast…
  • this bottle was especially fruity and clean.  however, it is always a crap shoot when opening a fantome bottle – since they are bottled by hand in small batches, they are very unpredictable in terms of carbonation and flavor.  every time you open a bottle you are rolling the dice.
  • on my trip to belgium last year, I tried to plan out a trip to Soy, where fantome is located.  however, it’s quite a trek from brussels, so the trip didn’t happen (some day!).
  • a little trivia – the equipment Dany Prignon uses over at fantome is from Brasserie d’Achouffe.
  • also, according to the same source, the brewery is named after “a legend of the nearby town of La Roche-en-Ardenne, which asserts that the ghost of the long-dead Countess Berthe de La Roche can still be seen walking amidst the ruins of the town’s castle
  • I just checked the ABV of this sucker – 8%??? where does the alcohol go?!?

fantome saison bottle

fantome saison in glass