Posts Tagged ‘bkyeast’

bkyeast experiment update

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

a copy

it’s hard to believe that it has been over eight months since I first pitched bkyeast’s isolates into some neutral blonde wort to experiment with.

  •  the initial tasting was a little underwhelming, likely due to the fact that I hadn’t given each strain enough time (only about a month) to work its magic.  therefore, I stashed some bottles aside and promptly forgot about them until a few weeks back, when I popped them into the fridge to chill.  here are the results.
  • Picture 153WY3191 brett isolate
    • appearance: fluffy white head that lasts, good clarity
    • aroma: citrus, lemon, earth
    • taste: dry, lemony, slight mustiness, great prickly carbonation, slight acidity
    • overall: very tasty, great end product, good option for a long-term saison

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture 156

  • cantillon iris isolate C2
    • appearance: bubbles rush to top of bottle when opened, fluffy, fine head
    • aroma: complex dirty funk with slight medicinal edge, unique, almost floral
    • taste: creamy, coating mouthfeel, slight perceived sweetness
    • overall: interesting aroma, lacks the dry effervescent brettiness that I prefer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Picture 164cantillon iris isolate C3
    • appearance: vigorous, fluffy, long-lasting head
    • aroma: chalky, fruity hard candy, medicinal finish
    • taste: creamy, sweet, floral
    • overall: another interesting result with good carbonation, just not as exciting or dramatic as WY3191

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • in the end, I preferred the carbonation, finish, and acidity of the WY3191 isolate.  who knows, maybe it will make another appearance in the future…

rye bottling, bkyeast brett tasting, bottle waxing

Saturday, January 5th, 2013

tasting the all brett trio

during the last couple of weeks I set aside some time between the lights and action of the holiday season to finish up some projects from the last few months.

  • first up was the bottling and kegging of the three variations of the rye amber I brewed a month ago.  the five gallons of all-brett B (FG: 1.008, ABV: 5.83%) and standard saison  (FG: 1.005, ABV: 6.3%) each went into kegs, while the two gallons of saison/brett blend  (FG: 1.006, ABV: 6.14%) were bottled.  after some thought, I primed with brown sugar for a little extra depth in the finished product – the molasses in the sugar seemed to complement the nuances of the saison in particular.
  • upon tasting samples of each variety, the saison predictably produced the most assertive aroma and flavors, while the brett B variety was somewhat neutral.  however, after recently tasting a matured version of my all brett B blonde,  I’m confident that the brett complexity will develop in the rye amber (the blonde had a very refreshing, funky, and dry brett character after a month in the fermentor and another in the bottle).

I also set aside part of an evening to review the three bkyeast variations I had bottled up about a month ago.  here are some thoughts:

  • WY3191 brett isolate: decent carbonation, clear gold, transparent; lemony, tart aroma; clean taste with a slight bretty lemon back; mellow and drinkable
  • cantillon iris isolate C2: very little carbonation, amber gold, transparent; funky fruit nose; floral earthy taste; pretty good depth/complexity, may add something interesting to a saison or wild beer, seems like it would take a while to fully develop
  • cantillon iris isolate C3: very light carb, amber gold, transparent; light stone fruit, characteristic brett finish; like C2, would make a good complementary fermenter, like C2, may have to wait a while for all the flavors to round out here

in addition, I finally got around to waxing a bunch of bottles for the long haul.

  • I waxed up my mead, banning, and apricot lambic bottles with dark grey wax, which represented the last of this year’s vintage.  I hit my bottles with a different color wax for easy age identification and display consistency.  I also buy my wax in big bulk chunks that I melt down in a larger coffee can over the stove and then pour into a small tomato paste can for bottle dipping so that the melted wax can reach further down the neck of each bottle.

bottles waiting to be filled               kegging

adding brown sugar to the bottles               waxed up and ready for the shelf

 

brettanomyces project updates, mead bottling

Sunday, November 25th, 2012

I wrapped up a long weekend of turkey and football with an intense bottling session down in the basement.

  • I kegged and bottled each of the three versions of my all-brett blonde.  after three weeks in the fermentor, the WLP644 trois strain finished at 1.006, the WLP653 lambicus strain finished at 1.011, and I was surprised to find that the WLP650 brux strain finished highest at 1.012.  the brux batch finished high enough that I placed all the brux bottles in a cooler to carb up (these should get consumed pretty fast, but you can never be too safe!).  I’m planning on trying a bottle of each variety in a week for a comprehensive tasting/comparison.
  • I also bottled each of the bkyeast half-gallon test batches that had been fermenting for about a month.  each half-gallon batch yielded four 12oz bottles and about 10oz of slurry.  the C2 cantillon isolate finished at 1.010, the C3 cantillon isolate finished at 1.012, and the wyeast berliner isolate (which had a pretty impressive pellicle and was crystal clear) finished at 1.008.  each sample had a unique and exciting flavor profile that I will elaborate upon in a week or two once the bottles carb up and I can get a proper tasting in.

after bottling and kegging the cornucopia of brett variations, I tossed some corks in my bucket of sanitizer and jumped right into bottling the last iteration of my mead, which entered the fermentor sixteen months ago.

  • mead is great for the holidays – it can be substituted for white wine at the dinner table and it also makes a great gift that can be stashed away for decades.  after a long secondary in a keg, my mead turned out crystal clear and managed to finish at 0.997 for an abv of 13.59%.  my sample had an intense honey and wildflower aroma.  I think my next mead will be a melomel (fruit mead) – maybe I can make use of some of my persimmon stash

               

               

 

 

banning II, bkyeast

Saturday, November 3rd, 2012

last weekend I put together the second incarnation of banning, my wild blonde that I bottled the week before.

  • the grain bill was the same as last year’s batch, but I switched up the hop additions toremove later hops that I feel would be underrepresented anyway after a year in the fermentor (13 gal batch):
    • 26.00 lb Pilsner (2 Row) Bel (2.0 SRM) Grain 94.55 %
      1.50 lb Wheat Malt, Bel (2.0 SRM) Grain 5.45 %
      3.00 oz Aged Saaz [1.00 %] (60 min) Hops 3.7 IBU
  • I also added a pinch of raw wheat berries, mashed higher (158F), and hit an OG of 1.068 (16.5 brix).  after a few days on just the slurry from the previous batch I pitched a single vial of WLP655, which took off shortly thereafter.

while I was brewing, the mailman delivered a much anticipated package from the east coast.

  • a few days earlier I had come across bkyeast’s blog via a post off embrace the funk’s facebook page.  dmitri, the man behind bkyeast, is a cell bio PhD student who isolates and banks yeast strains in his spare time.  he was generously sending out brettanomyces isolates as a community service, and I managed to score two isloates from cantillon iris dregs and one from WY3191.
  • after finishing up banning, I split two gallons of the wort into four sanitized gallon jugs, and each was inoculated with a different bkyeast isolate (I pitched my vial of WLP644 into the fourth jug).  banning’s neutral character, low hopping, and diverse sugar chain makeup should make it ideal for comparing the performance of the four different yeasts.  check in soon for an update!