Posts Tagged ‘amber’

monkish brewing tour, brett amber kegging, white tasting notes

Wednesday, August 29th, 2012

last weekend AP and I headed over to torrance to check out monkish brewing co’s tasting room and facility.

  • after sampling a few beers we toured the facility with none other than henry nguyen, who runs the place with his wife adriana.  henry also sourced and assembled every piece of the fifteen barrel brewery himself, and indulged me with some some details about his regular brewing practices.  the beers were great, the tour was fantastic, and the hospitality was unmatched.  thanks again!

I also finally got around to kegging the secondary-brett and all-brett versions of my amber ale after a couple months of exposure.

  • I dry-hopped each of the 5 gallons of secondary-brett and the 2.5 gallons of all-brett with 1 oz. of fuggles for five days, then racked them into 5 and 2.5 gallon corny kegs, respectively.  both beers finished at 1.009, which was the same FG for the non-brett control beer I kegged a month earlier (which may mean the brett needs more time in secondary, or just that the WLP575 is unusually attenuative, since according to my notes I mashed at 156F!).  the fuggles added a great earthy spiciness to the beer’s aroma, and samples of both were promising.  I’m planning on serving the all-brett version soon and giving the secondary-brett version a little more time to work its magic.

additionally, I cracked a bottle of white (blanc) last night for review (and to test for carbonation):

  • appearance: dark brown with reddish hue when held to light, bubbly white head that quickly fades to lacing, great carbonation
  • aroma: fantastic assertive brett, slight fruit
  • taste: intense but satisfying acidity, light oak and stone fruit elements that increase as beer warms, good body with lingering sourness
  • overall: I’m very satisfied with this beer’s interplay between brett and acidity.  the light oak and fruit from racking onto cabrillo’s dregs and cake could be increased for greater effect, especially the cherries, which could really shine here.  I’m thinking about racking onto a bunch of sour cherries during the next batch or serve this batch through a randall stuffed with cherries…

              

              

 

AP’s amber ale, end of hop harvest

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

while my pint preference has varied over the years from hoppy, to strong, and lately to sour, AP’s (AKA SWMBO‘s) has taken a different course altogether.

  • although she thoroughly enjoys the occasional sour and fresh IPA, AP has always leaned towards more malt and yeast-forward selections.  when I hinted last week that I was planning on brewing over the weekend, AP put her foot down and demanded a malty american amber session ale.
  • since the only other amber I brewed as of late involved a healthy amount of hops and a high OG, I reformulated my recipe utilizing jmo88’s recipe on homebrewtalk as inspiration (12 gal batch):
  • 18.00 lb Pale Malt (2 Row) US (2.0 SRM) Grain 77.92 %
    2.00 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt – 80L (80.0 SRM) Grain 8.66 %
    2.00 lb Munich Malt – 10L (10.0 SRM) Grain 8.66 %
    1.00 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt – 40L (40.0 SRM) Grain 4.33 %
    0.10 lb Chocolate Malt (350.0 SRM) Grain 0.43 %
    3.00 oz Cascade [5.50 %] (60 min) Hops 23.4 IBU
    1.00 oz Cascade [5.50 %] (Dry Hop 14 days) Hops
    1.00 oz Williamette [5.50 %] (20 min) Hops 4.7 IBU
    1.00 oz Williamette [5.50 %] (10 min) Hops 2.8 IBU
    1.00 oz Williamette [5.50 %] (0 min) Hops
  • I mashed in at 156F for more malt body, and low AA cascades helped get the IBUs down to under 30.  I spaced out and forgot to take an initial gravity reading, but at my average 80% efficiency the OG should be around 1.055 and should finish around 1.014 for a sessionable 5.3% end result.  I will probably skip the dry hops for five gallons, but may add them and/or apricot puree or extract to the other five for a little something different.
  • as for yeast, I used a couple packets of safale S-04, which were a good alternative to liquid yeast during the hot west coast shipping months and which should add even more to the malt spectrum.
  • on another note, after kegging my patersbier, I ended up the hop harvest by picking 4.25 oz. of cascade cones off my  in-ground cascade plant  I swapped out of a planter this year.  the cones’ aroma seemed a little subdued, so I will likely end up using them for bittering in an upcoming “local” saison.  stay tuned…

lambic prep and some housekeeping

Wednesday, October 6th, 2010

last friday I finally took some time to develop a lambic mash schedule.

  • lambics/lambic-based beers rate as some of my all-time favorites.  ever since AP and I visited jean van roy over at cantillon, I have been fascinated by these traditional beers and their methods of production.
  • creating these beers at home seemed daunting however, and I put the idea on the back burner until I was better equipped to handle such a task.  with the advent of my new brew setup and the completion of some successful brew sessions, I feel that I am ready to tackle my first (p)lambic.
  • after reviewing wild brews and some great lambic resources, and checking the mad fermentationist’s site to double-check some figures, I came up with this schedule based on a scaled-down version of mike sharp’s description of cantillon’s turbid mash:
    • LAMBIC TURBID MASH SCHEDULE (12-13 gal)
    • 15lb belgian pils (60%)
    • 10lb unmalted white wheat (40%)
    • 1. 12lb/gal = (25lb total grist)/(2.1 gal. @143F) = 113F mash
    • 2. hold 113F mash for 10 min
    • 3. add boiling water to get to 136.4F
    • 4. remove 0.57 gal. to kettle 2, heat to 176F at most
    • 5. add boiling water to get to 149F, hold for 15 min
    • 6. remove 2.27 gal. to kettle 2, keep at 176F at most
    • 7. add boiling water to get to 161.6F, hold for 20 min
    • 8. first runnings (2.83 gal) to boil kettle
    • 9. kettle 2 back into mash tun @ 176F = mash @~167F
    • 10. hold mash @167F for 20 min
    • 11. vorlauf and sparge with 185F water
    • 12. ~end up with 18.5 gal wort~
    • 13. divide wort into keggle (13.5 gal) and turkey fryer (5 gal)
    • 14. add 5.17 oz old/low AA hops to keggle @ start of boil
    • 15. boil down to ~12-13 gals*
    • 16. blend keggle and fryer and cool overnight
    • *take reading @ ~15 gals, see if near desired 1.05 OG (shouldn’t be), then boil down to 12-13 (should be around 1.05).  originally had 12,8lbs of grain, but would have to boil off 8 gallons to get near desired OG (not factoring in lower efficiency here either).
  • I plan on aging the beer for a year, then kegging 5 gallons and bottling the rest.  if all goes well, after doing this for 3 years I will have a 3 year flight of bottles and enough 1, 2, and 3 year lambic in kegs to blend up a tasty geuze.

I also managed to tie up some loose ends around the home brewery.